Webpages tagged with «linguistics»

Published Mar. 8, 2017 6:39 PM

We are delighted to announce the Norwegian Summer Institute on Language and Mind, a summer course in linguistics and philosophy in Norway, with lectures from international experts, including some of the most distinguished figures in linguistics and philosophy.

The theme for the institute in 2017 is 'Cognition and Computation’.  Classes are free and we have funding for some travel and accommodation bursaries. Applications are now closed. (The deadline for applications -- for admission and for bursaries -- was 25th April 2017).

More information on the Summer Institute homepage

Published July 21, 2016 12:01 PM

A workshop about inference, linguistic representation and mental representation in the interpretation and meaning of legal language

Published Feb. 4, 2016 11:29 AM

Courses to bring graduate students up to date with developments in the intersection of work on language and mind by presenting classes with leading researchers in the relevant fields. These will include linguists open to philosophical issues, and philosophers focused on linguistics and the cognitive sciences.

Published Sep. 25, 2015 4:38 PM
Published Feb. 20, 2013 1:53 PM
Published Jan. 28, 2013 12:38 PM

 

The focus of this course will be the view that communication involves inference to the best explanation of an utterance, where in normal cases the best explanation is that the speaker intended to inform the hearer of an intention to inform the hearer of something. This view derives from Grice's work on speaker meaning (1957) and on conversational maxims and implicatures (1975).

We will look at criticisms of this view which aim to show that (all or some) communication is not inferential, or does not involve the recovery of speaker intentions. We will also look at what this view of communication assumes about inference and about metarepresentation, and more broadly, at the explanatory role in cognitive science of talk about inferences over representations.

Published Jan. 28, 2013 12:24 PM

 

The focus of this course will be the view that communication involves inference to the best explanation of an utterance, where in normal cases the best explanation is that the speaker intended to inform the hearer of an intention to inform the hearer of something. This view derives from Grice's work on speaker meaning (1957) and on conversational maxims and implicatures (1975).

We will look at criticisms of this view which aim to show that (all or some) communication is not inferential, or does not involve the recovery of speaker intentions. We will also look at what this view of communication assumes about inference and about metarepresentation, and more broadly, at the explanatory role in cognitive science of talk about inferences over representations.

Published Feb. 22, 2012 10:06 AM