WEBINAR: Acoustic Methods, Sound Ethnography, Climate Justice. Environmental Lunchtime Discussion

What does it mean to listen to the ending of a world that has always already ended? How can we attend to what has been there but heard elsewhere, by someone else, that may not be ours to hear?  This week, geographer and sound artist Anja Kanngieser will introduce Climates of Listening, an ongoing conversation and collaboration with predominantly women, queer and transgender people in the Pacific.

Image may contain: Body of water, Sky, Sea, Ocean, Blue.

Photo by Anja Kanngieser.

The current condition of anthropogenic climate change is the outcome of centuries of colonisation, genocide and capitalist extraction. For many experiencing the frontline effects of rising sea levels, erosion, coral bleaching and increasingly intense and frequent natural disasters, these have always been entangled in existing environmental and social dispossession. While attention is drawn to spectacles of trauma or resilience, other stories of care between people, lands and oceans are also being told. How can we turn to listen to the slower and more nuanced stories, that imagine the world otherwise?

In this talk, Anja Kanngieser will introduce Climates of Listening, an ongoing conversation and collaboration with predominantly women, queer and transgender people in the Pacific (Fiji, Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Nauru and Papua New Guinea) working toward environmental and social justice. Using sonic ethnographies, the project centres relations between people and ecosystems by weaving together fieldrecordings, oral testimonies, poetry, song, music and radio composition. Attuned to the silences, gaps and faultlines in stories, the project seeks to amplify multifaceted and changing community narratives.​

About Anja Kanngieser

Anja Kanngieser is a geographer and sound artist. As an interdisciplinary scholar, they bring creative methods to the investigation of space and politics. AM’s current research broadly considers how sound reveals political, social, and economic relations between humans, environments and systems of governance. In their work AM begins with the premise of sound as a constant, a phenomenon that is always present – whether heard, felt, or sensed by human or non-human species and technologies.

About the event series

The OSEH Environmental Lunchtime Discussion series consists of short, 10-15 minute presentations by invited guests, followed by a discussion. We invite speakers from a wide variety of fields, both academic and beyond. The presentations are accessible and are aimed at anyone with an interest in environmental issues. All are welcome.

Tags: Environmental Humanities, HF, IKOS, OSEH, Sound Studies, Ethnography
Published Sep. 28, 2020 9:58 AM - Last modified Oct. 7, 2020 2:20 PM