The Tentacular Museum: On the co-curation of widening gaps. Environmental Lunchtime Discussion

What roles can museums and collections play, in the growing need to convey polyphonic narrations on climate change? In this presentation, Lotten Gustafsson Reinius discusses the multi-disciplinary dialogues and other co-curations as a tentacular weaving across differing knowledge regimes, scales and temporalities. 

Big museum hall with a massive ice block in the middle. A crack runs through the ice so that people can enter the ice.

The entrance to the exhibition "The Arctic - While the Ice Is Melting" invites visitors to walk through cracks in the ice. 

Photo: © Hendrik Zeitler

About the presentation

Visitors enter “The Arctic - While the Ice Is Melting” (shown at the Nordic museum in Stockholm from fall 2019) through a crack that splits a huge white block, signifying dissolving ice and other anthropocenic losses. The very presence of this striking symbol for the entangled relations of nature and culture implies radical change in an institution long devoted to national cultural history.
 
What roles can museums and collections play, in the growing need to convey polyphonic narrations on climate change? The presentation discusses the multi-disciplinary dialogues and other co-curations as a tentacular weaving across differing knowledge regimes, scales and temporalities. 
 
To read more on this issue we recommend the article "Tracing the Arctic; Arctic Traces" published in the Journal of Northern Studies written by Professor Lotten Gustafsson Reinius.

About the presenter

Professor Lotten Gustafsson Reinius shares her time between Stockholm University and the Nordic museum, since 2016 as visiting Hallwyl professor of ethnology. She has been professionally active for over a couple of decades as curator of a number of exhibitions and as researcher and lecturer in the fields of heritage studies and folklore, with a focus on global cultural history, museology, popular imagination, ritual and play. She is the former director of Museum of Ethnography in Stockholm and was the scientific leader of the Arctic while the ice is melting. Her current work concerns processes of heritage and claim in relation to boreal forests. 

About the event series

The OSEH Environmental Lunchtime Discussion series consists of short, 15 minute presentations by invited guests, followed by a discussion. We invite speakers from a wide variety of fields, both academic and beyond. The presentations are accessible and are aimed at anyone with an interest in environmental issues. All are welcome!

Tags: Environmental Humanities, Cultural history, Museums and Museology, Anthropocene, Museology and Cultural Heritage, Natural History, Climate Change, Climate Crisis, Ethnography
Published Apr. 26, 2022 12:09 PM - Last modified Apr. 26, 2022 12:09 PM