Gerda Helene Killmer-Rumpf

Doctoral Research Fellow - Linguistics
Image of Gerda Helene Killmer-Rumpf
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Mobile phone +47 939 54 136
Room HW 125
Username
Visiting address Niels Henrik Abels vei 36 Henrik Wergelands hus 0313 OSLO
Postal address Postboks 1102 Blindern 0317 OSLO
Other affiliations Faculty of Humanities (Student)

My background

I grew up in Germany. After I studied Speech Therapy, Linguistics and Speech and Language Pathology in the Netherlands and in South Africa, I have been working as speech therapist, lecturer and research assistant in the Netherlands, Switzerland and Germany. In my spare time, I get energized by doing Pilates and swimming. In order to relax, I enjoy reading modern and classical literature and doing Feldenkrais. Cultural activities (e.g. theatre plays and museums) are important sources of inspiration for me.

As a speech therapist, improving communication is among the most important goals of my research. Therefore, my research has a strong focus on the communicative abilities and disabilities of persons with aphasia (pwa). Aphasia is a communication disorder, often caused by a stroke, which affects the production and comprehension of language and the ability to read or write. Because of these language difficulties, pwa’s ability to communicate with others is impeded immensely. The language deficits compromise pwa’s abilities to take part in conversations which has crucial consequences for social aspects of their life.

Project description

With my PhD project, I aim to gain a better understanding of the interactive organization of

Conversations of persons with aphasia.

I explore this with empirical data collected from German face-to-face interactions of couples where one of the participants suffers from aphasia. The method used is Conversation Analysis. The data originates from the data base moca, corpus AphaDB provided by the University of Freiburg, Germany.

Prof. Dr. Jan Svennevig  (University of Oslo) and Dr. Suzanne Beeke (University College London) supervise my project.

 

Teaching

Speech therapy for persons with a developmental disability (fall 2010 and fall 2012)

Speech therapy and bilingualism (spring 2011 and spring 2012)

 

Collaborations

LOLA – the Laboratory for Oral Language Acquisition

MemoGram - Grammar and memory: evidence from agrammatic aphasia and probable Alzheimer's disease in German, Italian and Greek

 

Tags: Aphasia, Conversation Analysis, Psycholinguistics, Language impairment, Clinical Linguistics

Publications

  • Killmer, Helene; Svennevig, Jan & Beeke, Suzanne (2019). Joint planning talk.
  • Killmer, Helene; Svennevig, Jan & Beeke, Suzanne (2019). Joint planning talk in conversations of persons with aphasia.
  • Fyndanis, Valantis; Miceli, Gabriele; Semenza, Carlo; Capasso, Rita; Christidou, Paraskevi; De Pellegrin, Serena; Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Killmer, Helene; Messinis, Lambros; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis; Panagea, Eugenia; Smania, Nicola; Burchert, Frank & Wartenburger, Isabell (2017). (Morpho)syntactic production in agrammatic aphasia: Testing three hypotheses within a cross-linguistic approach..
  • Killmer, Helene (2017). Collaborative storytelling in conversations of persons with aphasia.
  • Killmer, Helene (2017). Repetition as a resource in conversations of a person with aphasia.
  • Killmer, Helene (2017). Repetition as a resource in conversations of a person with aphasia.
  • Varlokosta, Spyridoula; Efstratiadou, Eva; Wartenburger, Isabell; Burchert, Frank; Killmer, Helene; Chatziantoniou, Lina; Potagas, Constantin & Fyndanis, Valantis (2017). Morphosyntactic production in Greek-German bilingual agrammatic aphasia: A case study..
  • Fyndanis, Valantis; Arcara, Giorgio; Arfani, Dimitra; Burchert, Frank; Burgio, Francesca; Cagnin, Annachiara; Capasso, Rita; Christidou, Paraskevi; Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Killmer, Helene; Maculan, Anna; Messinis, Lambros; Miceli, Gabriele; Palla, Fabio; Panagea, Eugenia; Papageorgiou, Sokratis; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis; De Pellegrin, Serena; Semenza, Carlo; Smania, Nicola; Varlokosta, Spyridoula & Wartenburger, Isabell (2016). Time reference in agrammatic aphasia and probable Alzheimer’s disease: A cross-linguistic test of the PAst DIscourse LInking Hypothesis.. Frontiers in Psychology.  ISSN 1664-1078. . doi: 10.3389/conf.fpsyg.2016.68.00097
  • Fyndanis, Valantis; Arcara, Giorgio; Arfani, Dimitra; Burchert, Frank; Burgio, Francesca; Cagnin, Annachiara; Capasso, Rita; Christidou, Paraskevi; Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Killmer, Helene; Maculan, Anna; Messinis, Lambros; Miceli, Gabriele; Panagea, Eugenia; Palla, Fabio; Papageorgiou, Socratis; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis; De Pellegrin, Serena; Semenza, Carlo; Smania, Nicola; Varlokosta, Spyridoula & Wartenburger, Isabell (2016). Time reference in agrammatic aphasia and probable Alzheimer’s disease: A cross-linguistic test of the PAst DIscourse Linking Hypothesis..
  • Fyndanis, Valantis; Miceli, Gabriele; Semenza, Carlo; Christidou, Paraskevi; Killmer, Helene; Capasso, Rita; Burchert, Frank; De Pellegrin, Serena; Gandolfi, Marialuisa; Smania, Nicola; Messinis, Lambros; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis; Panagea, Eugenia; Papageorgiou, Sokratis; Varlokosta, Spyridoula & Wartenburger, Isabell (2016). Time reference in Greek, Italian and German agrammatic aphasia: A test of the PAst DIscource Linking Hypothesis..
  • Killmer, Helene; Frankel, Tali & Penn, Claire (2015). A study of repetition in the conversation of persons with aphasia.

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Published Oct. 14, 2016 1:52 PM - Last modified Nov. 27, 2018 3:06 PM