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Communication and cognitive impairment among elderly hospital patients

On Thursday 12.12, Tahreem Ghazal Siddiqui will present two studies about elderly hospital patients. Siddiqui is a PhD student in the research group for Health services research unit, Ahus and Institute of Clinical Medicine, UiO. In her PhD project, she investigates cognitive effects of  medication and doctor-patient communication among older patients.

Bilde av Tahreem Siddiqui

Siddiqui has a BSc in psychology from Roehampton University and an MSc in Clinical Mental Health Sciences from University College London, UK. She is interested in research related to neuropsychology, cognitive neuroscience, health psychology and clinical communication. She is working on a mixed method project examining the cognitive effect of central nervous system depressant medication and doctor-patient communication on treatment plan among older patients.

Siddiqui will give two presentations of 45 minutes, with a break in between. Both presentations will be given in English, and they are open for everyone.

10:15: Discharge conversation among geriatric patients and specialists-physicians

11:00: Break

11:15: The association between using painkillers, antianxiety and sedative drugs and cognitive function among older hospitalized patients

Discharge conversation among geriatric patients and specialists-physicians

Tahreem Ghazal Siddiqui1,2, Socheat Cheng1,2,  Christofer Lundqvist1,2, Ramune Grambite1,3, Pål Gulbrandsen1,2, Jennifer Gerwing1.

1Health Services Research Unit, Akershus University Hospital, 2 Institute of Clinical Medicine, Campus Ahus, University of Oslo,3 Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway,

For patients leaving the hospital, a treatment plan is the intended set of activities that should happen to help the patient to become healthier or stay as healthy as possible. While the treatment plan is directed towards and tailored to the particular patient, the activities involved in the plan could be carried out by the patient, the patient’s general practitioner, the specialist- physician or other health care professionals. Treatment plans are particularly important to patients because they pertain both to how patients can manage their health when they are on their own (without the immediate support of the hospital) and to the available support system. 

The purpose of this study is to examine the discharge conversation between older in-patients and specialist-physicians. Specifically, we are analysing these discussions for information about the treatment plan (e.g., about medication, plans for future contact). These plans are important for the patient to avoid readmission and adverse events (e.g., related to medication use). Geriatric patients might find the discharge conversation and information about the treatment plan challenging due to reduced cognitive function. Thus, we will also analyse the conversation for cues of reduced cognitive function, with the intention that doctors can learn to recognize these cues and adapt accordingly. This is a work in progress, definitions of treatment plan and cognitive cues based on presented examples will be discussed.

The association between using painkillers, antianxiety and sedative drugs and cognitive function among older hospitalized patients

Tahreem Ghazal Siddiqui1,2 Socheat Cheng1,2, ,Espen Saxhaug Kristoffersen1,3,4 Michael Gossop5 Ramune Grambaite1,6.Christofer Lundqvist1,2,3  

1. Health Services Research Unit, Akershus Univeristy Hospital, Lorenskog, Norway. 2. Institute of Clinical Medicine, Campus Ahus, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Norway. 3. Department of Neurology, Akershus Univeristy Hospital, Lorenskog, Norway. 4. Department of General Practice, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, Norway. 5. National Addiction Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, UK. 6. Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway

Opioids, benzodiazepine and Z-hypnotics are Central Nervous System Depressants (CNSDs), that clinical guidelines recommend for short-term pain, insomnia or anxiety management. These guidelines also include a comprehensive overview of physical side effect of these medications, however the recommendation and research on cognitive side effects is less emphasised. CNSDs create an inhibitory effect that may lead to reduced cognitive function in older patients. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between CNSDs use and cognitive function in older in-patients.

There are two objectives of this project, firstly to assess the relationship between CNSD use and general and domain specific cognitive function among older patients in a cross-sectional study. Secondly, use neuropsychological instruments to investigate drug-induced cognitive impairment and differentiate it from mild cognitive impairment and dementia in older patients. The first part of the project is completed and the results will be presented. The second part of the study is ongoing and preliminary results will be discussed.

Published Nov. 21, 2019 2:45 PM - Last modified Nov. 21, 2019 2:45 PM