Participants

Anne Danielsen
Project Manager, Researcher, Dr. Art.
e-mail: anne.danielsen@imv.uio.no

Rhythm in the Age of Digital Reproduction

The project is a study of micro-rhythmic relationships in computer-based, groove-oriented music. The empirical focus will be on African-American popular music styles, such as neo-soul and contemporary R&B. The core of the project consists of analyses and interpretations of selected songs within these traditions - by artists like D'Angelo, Beyoncé, and Missy Elliott. The work builds on the framework for analysis and interpretation of groove-oriented music developed in Danielsen's dissertation on 1970s' funk music, as well as the analytical findings of this work.


Hans-T. Zeiner-Henriksen

Research Fellow/PhD student
e-mail: h.t.zeiner-henriksen@imv.uio.no

"The Most Significant Beat". A study of rhythm and sound in electronic dance music.

In electronic dance music it seems plausible that there are connections between rhythmic patterns and patterns of movement. A key question is how this connection may impart significance to the specific sounds. Tracks with specific rhythmic patterns where this connection seems especially evident will be investigated, with electronic dance music of the 1990s in the centre of attention (Basement Jaxx, Daft Punk, Leftfield, Röyksopp). Elements of rhythm as well as sound will be in focus. A comparative study of tracks from 70s disco and 80s techno/house will be carried out, elucidating aspects related to conversions in production processes and transference of rhythmic patterns and sound.

 

Maria Witek
Research Assistant
e-mail: maria.witek@imv.uio.no

Groove Experience: Emotional and Physiological Responses to Groove-Based Music

The study investigates physiological and emotional responses to groove-based music through qualitative interviews, physiological measurements and subjective rating scales (GEMS). It was revealed that physiological peak responses were elicited from peak structural events such as large scale variations across the repeating groove, while a steady listening state in synchronization with the music was not reflected in the recordings. This state was however expressed in the interviews, albeit with differing understandings of its emotional quality. The research therefore extends understanding of physiological peak responses to music, shows their operation within groove-based musics for the first time and poses implications for alternative conceptualizations of affective experience of groove-based music.
 

Eirik Askerøi
Research Assistant
e-mail: eirik.askeroi@imv.uio.no

Pioneer by mishap, art by accident: The shaping of new sound through non-intended or wrong use of technology

This project seeks to explore how non-intended or even wrong use of technology has contributed to the shaping of new stylistic directions in popular music. The point of departure is how the structuring or institutionalisation of a cultural field contributes to new, creative ways of opposing the exact same structures. The attention is focused on the way certain elements in the music on the one hand seem similar, but on the other hand actually are quite different. I will show how this difference in sameness is closely connected to the level on which stylistic and genre based musical codes are appropriated.


Ragnhild Brøvig Andersen
Master student
e-mail: ragnhiba@student.hf.uio.no

Groove and Sound in Trip-hop

The intention of this study is to investigate trip-hop grooves by focusing on the micro-rhythmical shifts from structures of references, and look into how the sound contributes to shaping the groove. The reason for concentrating on trip-hop is that this music is most often programmed and sampled, and is rather an interaction between producer and technology - than between different instrumentalists. The producer’s ability to manipulate sounds and place them with milliseconds of accuracy is of high interest when investigating groove and sound. The main hypothesis of this study is that the essential understanding of what makes listeners classify music as trip-hop, lies precisely in the groove and the sound. These aspects have often been neglected.


Kristoffer Yddal Bjerke

Master student
e-mail: bjerke.kristoffer@gmail.com

Timbral shaping of the groove experience – a study of the relation between timbral and rhythmic aspects in contemporary African-American hiphop

Most research on groove concentrates on how rhythmic events are placed in time, both in relation to a given framework and other rhythmic events. The timbral shaping and character of these events have been given little attention. The main objective of this project is to search for a better understanding of the experience of grooves by integrating various sound parameters. One important issue is to explore how dimensions like height, width, depth and timbre affect our tolerance of rhythmic tension and dissonance.

 

Kjetil Klette Bøhler
Master student
e-mail: kjetilklette@yahoo.no

A study of groove and improvisation in Afro-Cuban jazz

Traditional jazz research has normally tended to interpret jazz from a modernistic angle. The similarity between jazz and classical art music is emphasized with regards to development, narrative, linearity and harmonic complexity (cf. Gridley, Berendt, Tirro etc.). In my thesis I will investigate groove and improvisation in Afro-Cuban jazz within the frame of modern groove research (cf. Danielsen). I will mainly discuss the instruments’ interaction and improvisation, with a particular focus on rhythmic structures, as well as ideals of phrasing and improvisation in Afro-Cuban jazz.


Kristoffer Carlsen
Master student
e-mail: kristofc@student.hf.uio.no

Groove Events and the Experience of Pulse in Contemporary Afro-American Popular Music

The main topic of this study will be how to locate pulse defining groove elements in music, mainly in the genres neo-soul, modern r&b and hip-hop. A majority of the selected music consists of programmed grooves with micro-rhythmical variations. I will concentrate on grooves with a constant pattern, avoiding the variations and inaccuracies organic grooves hold. One objective is finding out whether similarities in programming methods, applied to different grooves, involve the same aural experience.

 


Associated researchers:

Tellef Kvifte
Professor, Dr. Philos
e-mail: tellef.kvifte@imv.uio.no

Time in music software

The study concerns how musical time in its various appearences as rhythm, meter and form, is represented in music software, and how time may be manipulated and controlled in such software. Conceptually, the project draws on earlier work on meter and rhythm, especially concerning description of microrhythmic phenomena as well as so-called 'asymmetrical meters'. Important are also concepts from earlier work on instrument control.


Mats Johansson

Research Fellow/PhD student
e-mail: mats.johansson@imv.uio.no

Melodic phrase as time-controlling mechanism – investigating the formative dialectics between melodic rhythm and meter

This study is based on the assumption that intuitive recognition of melodic-rhythmic phrases, as performed within certain limits of variability, holds a privileged position in the conception of musical rhythm and meter within certain styles. I will investigate into performance practices within styles where no beat or pulse is represented other than through melodic rhythm. I will specifically focus on music examples where smaller rhythmical units, such as beats and measures, vary in length, and where other mechanisms than an underlying stable reference (meter) seem to be the central vehicles by which control over timing in relation to overall structure and tempo is achieved.
 

Published Nov. 12, 2008 4:10 PM - Last modified Aug. 9, 2010 11:03 AM