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Political Philosophy Looks to Antarctica

We are at a unique point in history to influence the ethical dimensions of the decisions regarding territory and natural resources in Antarctica. With that end in mind, in this project we assess the moral grounds of claims over territory and natural resources in the White Continent, as well as the moral legitimacy of the Antarctic Treaty System.  

Photo: Pablo Ruiz, Instituto Antártico Chileno (INACH)

***First call for papers***

The project is pleased to announce its first CFPs to the first open workshop, to be held at the University of Oslo, December 6-7, 2018. We cordially invite academics at all stages of their career development, and especially graduate students and early career researchers to send us submissions related to wide normative questions relating to territorial rights, resource rights and the legitimacy of international bodies, or to more specific questions connected to the project’s main aims. Read more about this below.
 
Our primary objective is to bring political philosophy to bear on analyses of Antarctic politics more generally, and of the Antarctic Treaty System more specifically, by focusing on two topics. First, we are interested in papers that analyze claims over territory and natural resources in Antarctica from a normative perspective. Second, we are interested in papers that carry out a normative analysis of the political legitimacy of the Antarctic Treaty System, and/or compare it to other international regimes.

Those who wish to participate should submit a 500 word abstract (max) with contact details to Hannah Monsrud Sandvik (h.m.sandvik@ifikk.uio.no), no later than September 15th.

The selected candidates will be notified by the end of September and should send their full papers by November 1st. The project will cover the costs of their trip to Oslo and their accommodation, on the condition that the participants submit their papers by the deadline.

About the project

Global pressure over natural resources in Antarctica will mount in the coming decades. Three pressing factors might motivate states to claim exclusive rights to Antarctica: climate change, dwindling natural resources in occupied territories, and the fact that, by virtue of Article IV of the Antarctic Treaty, the question of sovereignty in the White Continent remains unresolved. We are thus at a unique point in history to influence the ethical dimensions of the decisions that may govern Antarctica in the future.

So far, most analyses of Antarctic politics have taken a descriptive and matter-of-fact approach, while political philosophy has been blind to Antarctica as a case study. In this project, we use these blindspots as a point of departure.

Objectives

  • Primary objectives

To carry out a normative analysis of claims over territory and natural resources in Antarctica, and to develop a systematic normative framework with which to morally assess these claims.

To carry out a normative analysis of the political legitimacy of the Antarctic Treaty System, and to develop a systematic normative framework with which to morally assess it.

  • Secondary objectives

To take Antarctic politics and, more specifically, the Antarctic Treaty System, as a unique locus wherefrom to rethink certain key concepts and theories of territorial rights and rights over natural resources, on the one hand, and political legitimacy, on the other.

 

Financing

Polar Programme, Norwegian Research Council

Duration

September 1, 2017 until August 30, 2020.

Cooperation

Arctic University of Norway, University of Southampton (UK), University College Cork (Ireland), Queens University (Canada), University of Tasmania (Australia), Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile.

Tags: Antarctica, political philosophy, natural resources, sovereignty
Published Feb. 16, 2017 11:37 AM - Last modified June 26, 2018 12:00 PM